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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Legal aspects of the hospital"s role in obtaining organs for transplantation found in the catalog.

Legal aspects of the hospital"s role in obtaining organs for transplantation

Jane E. Baluss

Legal aspects of the hospital"s role in obtaining organs for transplantation

by Jane E. Baluss

  • 117 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Institute of Government, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in [Chapel Hill] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • North Carolina.,
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Donation of organs, tissues, etc. -- Law and legislation -- North Carolina.,
    • Transplantation of organs, tissues, etc. -- Law and legislation -- North Carolina.,
    • Tort liability of hospitals -- North Carolina.,
    • Hospitals -- Law and legislation -- North Carolina.,
    • Donation of organs, tissues, etc. -- Law and legislation -- United States.,
    • Tort liability of hospitals -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementJane E. Baluss.
      SeriesHealth law bulletin ;, no. 65 (Dec. 1983), Health law bulletin ;, no. 65.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsKFN7767.D65 B35 1983
      The Physical Object
      Pagination17 p. ;
      Number of Pages17
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3002566M
      LC Control Number84621642

      The transplant surgeon determines whether the organ is medically suitable for that patient or may refuse the organ—for example, if the patient is too sick to be transplanted or cannot be reached in time. Most organs go to patients in the area where the organs were recovered. The others are shared with patients in other regions of the country.   Myth: I'm not in the best of health. Nobody would want my organs or tissues. Fact: Very few medical conditions automatically disqualify you from donating organs. The decision to use an organ is based on strict medical criteria. It may turn out that certain organs are not suitable for transplantation, but other organs and tissues may be fine.

      the source of organs, many fewer organs are available than patients who await them. In , Congress enacted the National Organ Transplant Act, which established a task force on organ transplantation to examine the ethical, social, and economic aspects of organ procurement. In that year, , persons were declared dead.   Because selling organs is illegal, the profit opportunities from obtaining organs induce many people to obtain them by violence. Many people find the selling of organs morally objectionable.

        The field of deceased donation involves unique ethical challenges in addition to those that are shared with other areas of medicine. Historically, the tension between autonomy and nonmaleficence with duty to the society is one of the longest standing issues in organ donation. Over time, the field of donation medicine has expanded tremendously. 4 This increased breadth and . Organ transplantation is one of the great advances in modern medicine. Unfortunately, the need for organ donors is much greater than the number of people who actually donate. Every day in the United States, 21 people die waiting for an organ and more than , (, Nov. 1, ) men, women, and children await life-saving organ.


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Legal aspects of the hospital"s role in obtaining organs for transplantation by Jane E. Baluss Download PDF EPUB FB2

A history of organ transplantation The medical practice of organ transplantation has grown by leaps and bounds over the last 50 years. The major transplant-related medical advances in the last century include: • Successful transplantation of different kinds of organs What began with the kidney has now expanded to hearts, lungs, livers and.

Ethical and legal aspects of organ transplantation in Iran. obtain an organ from unrelated donors. and media all have a decisive role in the culture of organ donation, which is the only.

Annotations Am. Heart J. July, Legal aspects of human organ transplantation What are the legal problems involved in human organ transplantation?'-" In general, they are related to live donors, cadavers, recipients, attending physicians, and next of : J.G.

Castel. After 50 years, many of these ethical issues remain. How best to organize organ transplantation, to increase the number of organ donors, allocate organs, and regulate transplantation and organ donation are constantly works in progress.

Changes try to improve patient access, improve transplantation outcomes, and increase the number of : Richard J. Howard, Danielle L. Cornell. The legal framework governing organ donation in the United States is built on principles uniquely designed to support the system of transplantation.

Understanding how the laws are designed and operate in practice provides insight into organ donation practices and performance and illuminates how the law is utilized to drive change in the by: 4. Transplantation is a lifesaving treatment for many forms of solid organ failure.

In the past half century, major improvements in surgical techniques, anesthesia, immunosuppression (IS), and perioperative care have led to a dramatic improvement in patient and graft survival, particularly following kidney and liver transplantation.

The volume brings together international experts' views on the interface between medicine, law and ethics as they relate to hospital policy and procedures. Topics explored include: ethics committees, informed consent, malpractice, medical experts and the courts, medical records, use of computers, DNR, death, organ transplants and bio-medical.

Delmonico, a leading voice on ethical organ transplantation, had planned a February summit in Rome for representatives of more than 40 countries to discuss the ethics of transplanting organs. Transplant tourism (TT) has been used to indicate travel outside of one’s country of residence for the principal purpose of obtaining organ transplantation services[].

TT unlike general medical tourism, has always been surrounded with controversy regarding the source of organs, donor’s care after transplantation, and recipient outcome. Organ Donation Name University Organ Donation Introduction Saving a life may be the best possible deed one can perform in his/her life.

One way through which an The service is % legal. FREE Essays; Essay writing help. Hire a writer Get paper rewritten Editing service Hide a paper option.

Services. Free Q&A Free Essay Topics Donate paper. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) regulate hospital compliance with all aspects of the U.S. donor program, and The Joint Commission requires hospitals to have a written agreement with an organ procurement organization (OPO).

Hospitals also are required to have policies and procedures for organ and tissue procurement and donation. Organ transplantation was something Kant had a direct opinion of, though he died in In 18th-century Europe, the poor were being exploited for their teeth, which were transplanted into the jaws of the willing rich.

Today, said Kerstein, “selling organs is wrong in the current context it is likely to occur.”. Rationing is unavoidable in organ transplantation, so the system for allocating organs must be just and fair. Justice requires some rule or policy that ensures that the supply of donated organs is used wisely and consistently with what donors and their families would wish, such as giving priority to saving children’s lives, or to American.

Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good.

During the last several decades physicians and the community have needed urgent changes in the legal codes for accepting brain death (BD) as death, to obtain organs from heart-beating donors. Description. Now in its seventh edition, Bridgit Dimond’s Legal Aspects of Nursing is the definitive guide to the essential law that nurses and healthcare professionals need to n in an engaging style, the book shows the application of the law to everyday nursing situations showing the relevance and importance of legal considerations to nursing practice.

Some types of organ transplantation have become established and important health care services. To the extent that the lack of organs is a barrier to the provision of needed treatment, the medical profession has an obligation to promote policies and protocols to procure organs for needed treatment consistent with societal values.

Organ transplantation is certainly one of the “miracles” of modern medicine. The impossible dream of replacing a dead or dying vital organ, such as a kidney or a heart, with a living one became a reality on Decemwhen Drs. Joseph Murray and John Merrill of Peter Bent Brigham Hospital transplanted a kidney from one monozygotic twin to another [1].

Organ transplantation -- the surgical removal of a healthy organ from one person and its transplantation into another person whose organ has failed or was injured -.

Voluntary, altruistic organ donation for transplantation, commonly called the“gift of life,” is the sole method of acquiring organs in the United States. Unfortunately, this means of obtaining organs has not nearly kept up with the need, which has grown because of the success of organ transplantation.

The law established a centralized registry for organ matching and placement while outlawing the sale of human organs. More thanpeople are .Financial coordinators have detailed knowledge of financial matters and hospital billing.

The financial coordinator works with other members of the transplant team, insurers, and administrative personnel to coordinate and clarify the financial aspects of the patient's care before, during, and after the transplant.Organ donation is the process when a person allows an organ of their own to be removed and transplanted to another person, legally, either by consent while the donor is alive or dead with the assent of the next of kin.

Donation may be for research or, more commonly, healthy transplantable organs and tissues may be donated to be transplanted into another person.